Bitcoin & Beyond: An Introduction

$195.00

Re-Broadcast on October 26, 2017

This course explains what virtual currency is, how it works and the legal and regulatory issues surrounding its use. The course also discusses the possible uses of the Blockchain/distributed ledger beyond recording virtual currency transactions and the possible legal and regulatory issues. Finally, the course introduces the concept of the “smart contract” and how it could be used to change the world of financial transactions.

This course is co-sponsored by Wolters Kluwer.

Key topics to be discussed:

  • What is Virtual Currency
  • What legal and regulatory issues affect use of virtual currency
  • What is the Blockchain and uses beyond virtual currency
  • Smart Contracts – the future of self-executing contracts

 
Date / Time: October 26, 2017

  • 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Eastern
  • 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Central
  • 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm Mountain
  • 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Pacific

 
Choose a format:

  • Live Video Broadcast/Re-Broadcast: Watch Program “live” in real-time, must sign-in and watch program on date and time set above. May ask questions during presentation via chat box. Qualifies for “live” CLE credit.
  • On-Demand Video: Access CLE 24/7 via on-demand library and watch program anytime. Qualifies for self-study CLE credit. On-demand versions are made available 7 business days after the original recording date and are view-able for up to one year.

 
All Access Pass: Before you buy, access this class and all other myLawCLE programs, over 120 new live classes every year, for only $69 dollars per month. Purchase the All Access Pass first. Click here for more information.

Clear

Re-Broadcast on October 26, 2017

Susan Ross, Esq. is based in Norton Rose Fulbright’s New York Office with a practice focused on technology and US privacy matters.

Sue’s extensive experience with technology and technology contracts includes negotiating, drafting, and interpreting over 10,000 computer hardware and software, consulting, outsourcing, Internet, electronic signatures, web hosting, application service providers and non-disclosure agreements, many of which were for a federal government contractor. 

Sue also handles US privacy matters, including security breach laws, as well as assisting clients with their questions and compliance efforts relating to Red Flag Rule, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) Privacy and Security Rules, Gramm-Leach-Bliley, Telephone Consumer Protection Act, CAN-SPAM, and Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (“FACTA”). Sue has assisted clients with privacy and information security questions relating to the Payment Card Industry standards, provided counseling on a wide variety of labor and employment matters that raised privacy issues, and created privacy policies (including Binding Corporate Rules) for corporations, as well as for web sites. Sue has experience counseling clients on advertising and contests and sweepstakes matters. 

Sue’s data breach experience has ranged from assisting clients in determining whether a breach, in fact, occurred; to working with third-party forensic investigators; to preparing the consumer and law enforcement notifications; to drafting the 8-K or similar public announcement. She has also participated in mock data breach exercises and assisted with “lessons learned” to help clients fill any gaps identified during those exercises.


Kathleen A. Scott, Esq. is a senior counsel in the New York office representing some of the world’s largest international financial institutions concentrating on a broad range of financial services regulatory, anti-money laundering and privacy matters.

Kathleen represents financial institution clients with respect to the bank regulatory aspects of mergers and acquisitions, establishment of new banking organizations and nonbanking affiliates, and other transactions.

Kathleen advises foreign and domestic banks and other financial institutions on a broad range of federal and state regulatory issues affecting all their operations and interacts routinely with federal and state banking regulators. She has expertise regarding U.S. federal and various other state banking laws and regulations regarding banks as well as nonbank financial companies that might require licensing at the state level.

Kathleen also counsels financial institutions facing enforcement or other supervisory actions or investigations by state and federal regulators on their compliance with federal consumer, privacy and anti-money laundering legislation and regulations. More specifically, she handles compliance with the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act for banks and other financial institutions and related financial privacy and information security matters. She also advises financial institutions on a broad range of anti-money laundering compliance and enforcement issues.

Kathleen began her career as an attorney for the United States Department of Treasury and also served as an assistant counsel for the New York State Banking Department before going into private practice at two other major law firms in New York before joining Norton Rose Fulbright.

Since 2005, she has written a bi-monthly column on International Banking for the New York Law Journal. In addition, she routinely contributes to the Financial Services: Regulation Tomorrow blog, which provides insight and commentary on the global financial regulatory environment.

CLE Accreditation:
mylawCLE seeks approval in all states.

CLE 2.00 – AK
CLE 2.00 – AL
CLE 2.00 – AR
CLE 2.00 – AZ
CLE 2.00 – CA
CLE 2.40 – CO
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CLE 2.00 – GA
CLE 2.00 – HI

CLE 2.00 – IA
CLE 2.00 – ID
CLE 2.00 – IL
CLE 2.00 – IN
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CLE 2.00 – KY
CLE 2.00 – LA
CLE 2.00 – ME
CLE 2.00 – MN
CLE 2.40 – MO

CLE 2.00 – MP
CLE 2.00 – MS
CLE 2.00 – MT
CLE 2.00 – NC
CLE 2.00 – ND
CLE 2.00 – NE
CLE 2.00 – NH
CLE 2.40 – NJ
CLE 2.00 – NM
CLE 2.00 – NV

CLE 2.40 – NY
CLE 2.00 – OH
CLE 2.40 – OK
CLE 2.00 – OR
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CLE 2.00 – PR
CLE 2.40 – RI
CLE 2.00 – SC
CLE 2.00 – TN
CLE 2.00 – TX

CLE 2.00 – UT
CLE N/A – VA
CLE 2.40 – VI
CLE 2.00 – VT
CLE 2.00 – WA
CLE 2.40 – WI
CLE 2.40 – WV
CLE 2.00 – WY

Accreditation Policy
myLawCLE will seek credit where attending attorneys are primarily licensed for all of its live webinars and live teleconferences, except in states which allow for reciprocity (see reciprocity section below). Credit for CLE in a self-study format is sought for in most states; however, some states do not allow for CLE credit to be earned in a self-study format (see the self-study section below). Many states typically decide whether a program qualifies for MCLE credit in their jurisdiction 4-8 weeks after the program application is submitted. For many live events, credit approval is not received prior to the program. Credit hours granted are subject to approval from each state.

Reciprocity
Additionally, some states allow for credit to be granted on a 1:1 reciprocal basis for courses approved in another mandatory CLE jurisdiction state. This is known as a reciprocity provision and includes the following states: AK, AR, CO, FL, ME, MT, ND, NH, NJ, NY, PR, and SD. myLawCLE does not seek direct accreditation of live webinars or teleconferences in these states.

On-demand CLE
myLawCLE will seek on-demand approval in all states except Virginia and Arkansas (outside reciprocal provisions stated above).


myLawCLE Credit Guarantee
myLawCLE offers a program and credit approval guarantee. If a registered attendee is unhappy with a CLE program they have attended, myLawCLE will offer that attended access to another complimentary CLE or a full refund in order to insure the attendeeís satisfaction.

Additionally, on all online CLE programs application for approval will be made in all states where attending attorneys are primarily licensed in. If a registered attorney does not receive credit from their state for any reason, a full refund will be granted.

Section I. Introduction

Section II. What is virtual currency

Section III. Legal and regulatory issues

Section IV. Case study – what have courts said

Section V. SEC – can you have a virtual currency exchange-traded fund

Section VI. Blockchain/distributed ledger

Section VII. Smart Contracts