Native American Law

$195.00

CLE credits earned: 2 General Credits (WA 2 Law and Legal)

This session will provide a foundational introduction to federal Indian law. The session will start with an introduction to who is an Indian, what is an Indian tribe, and what is “Indian country.” This first portion of the session will also touch on tribal sovereign immunity. With these foundational concepts in place, the session will then provide a historical overview of federal Indian law and policy, starting with the pre-colonial era and culminating with the modern self-determination era. The session will then explore what Indian treaties are and their importance to federal Indian law, and then delve into a discussion of the federal trust relationship between the federal government and tribes. Next, the session will provide a primer on both criminal and civil jurisdiction in Indian country. The session will conclude with a discussion of Indian land status and natural resource development in Indian country.

This session is ideal for anyone interested in obtaining an introductory knowledge of federal Indian law, as well as those who might want a refresher in basic principles. Given the relationship between the federal government and tribes, a working knowledge of federal Indian law is crucial for anyone practicing federal law. Following completion of this session, attendees will have a basic understanding of jurisdictional issues arising in Indian country, as well as the keys legal matters one is likely to encounter when working in Indian country or with a tribe/tribal organization.

Key topics to be discussed:

•   Who is an India, what is an Indian tribe, and what is “Indian country”
•   Tribal Sovereign immunity
•   Historical overview of federal Indian law and policy
•   Federal trust relationship between the federal government and tribes
•   Primer on criminal and civil jurisdiction in Indian country
•   Indian land status and natural resource development in Indian country

Date / Time: May 7, 2021

•   2:00 pm – 4:10 pm Eastern
•   1:00 pm – 3:10 pm Central
•   12:00 pm – 2:10 pm Mountain
•   11:00 am – 1:10 pm Pacific

Choose a format:

•   Live Video Broadcast/Re-Broadcast: Watch Program “live” in real-time, must sign-in and watch program on date and time set above. May ask questions during presentation via chat box. Qualifies for “live” CLE credit.
•   On-Demand Video: Access CLE 24/7 via on-demand library and watch program anytime. Qualifies for self-study CLE credit. On-demand versions are made available 5 business days after the original recording date and are view-able for up to one year.

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Original Broadcast Date: April 5, 2021

Elizabeth Kronk Warner | Dean | S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

Elizabeth Kronk Warner is Dean and Professor of Law at the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah. She was formerly Associate Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Kansas School of Law (KU), where she was also the Director of the Tribal Law and Government Center.

Dean Kronk Warner is a nationally recognized expert in the intersection of Environmental and Indian law. She has taught courses in Property, Indian, Environmental and Natural Resources Law, and supervised the KU Tribal Judicial Support Clinic. She has received several teaching excellences awards, co-authored several books on environmental issues and Native Americans, and has over 40 articles and book chapters to her credit. Dean Kronk Warner, a citizen of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, served as an appellate judge for the tribe and as a district judge for the Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribe.

Dean Kronk Warner previously was an active member of the Federal Bar Association, serving on its national Board of Directors. In 2014, she received the Federal Bar Association President’s Award for leadership and extraordinary service, commitment, and guidance to the Federal Bar Association and its members. She is currently active in the American Bar Association, where she is co-chaired of the Native American Resources Committee. She holds a J.D. from the University of Michigan, a B.S. from Cornell University, and also studied at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

Accreditation Policy
myLawCLE seeks accreditation for all programs in all states except, ME, VA, and WV. Each attending attorney/paralegal will receive a certificate of completion following the close of the CLE program as proof of attendance. In required states, myLawCLE records attorney/paralegals attendance, in all other states attorney/paralegal is provided with the approved CLE certificate to submit to their state bar or governing association.

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    Live Video Broadcasts

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    “Live” Re-Broadcasts

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Reciprocity
Many states allow for credit to be granted on a 1:1 reciprocal basis for courses approved in another mandatory CLE jurisdiction state. This is known as a reciprocity provision and includes the following states: AK, AR, HI, CT, FL, ME, MO, MT, ND, NH, NM, NJ, and NY. myLawCLE does not seek direct accreditation of live webinars or teleconferences in these states.

I. Who is an India, what is an Indian tribe, and what is “Indian country” 2:00-2:20
II. Tribal Sovereign immunity 2:20-2:40
III. Historical overview of federal Indian law and policy 2:40-3:00
IV. Break 3:00-3:10
V. Federal trust relationship between the federal government and tribes 3:10-3:30
VI. Primer on criminal and civil jurisdiction in Indian country 3:30-3:50
VII. Indian land status and natural resource development in Indian country 3:50-4:10