Parental Alienation in American Family Courts: The Legal Landscape

$195.00

CLE credits earned: 2 GENERAL (or 2 LAW & LEGAL for WA state)

The debate is over: there is no doubt that Parental Alienation exists. The detractors continue to create a smokescreen of “controversy” both in professional literature and in courts. But an overwhelming number of family courts around the country and internationally have accepted the notion of parental alienation, condemned it, and have acknowledged it as a significant factor in their decisions modifying custody and providing other appropriate intervention. Regardless of how one labels the phenomenon—call it parental alienation, brainwashing, programming, or pathological parenting—American family courts have to come a conclusion that parental alienation exists and needs to be addressed. As one trial judge wrote: “Anybody old enough to drink coffee knows that embittered parties can and do manipulate their children.”

Key topics to be discussed:

•   What parental alienation is
•   How the courts have defined the phenomenon
•   How family court judges, when presented with proper evidence, have ordered appropriate interventions

Date / Time: September 30, 2020

•   2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Eastern
•   1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Central
•   12:00 pm – 2:00 pm Mountain
•   11:00 am – 1:00 pm Pacific

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•   Live Video Broadcast/Re-Broadcast: Watch Program “live” in real-time, must sign-in and watch program on date and time set above. May ask questions during presentation via chat box. Qualifies for “live” CLE credit.
•   On-Demand Video: Access CLE 24/7 via on-demand library and watch program anytime. Qualifies for self-study CLE credit. On-demand versions are made available 7 business days after the original recording date and are view-able for up to one year.

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Original Broadcast Date: January 9, 2020

Ashish Joshi, Esq. is the owner and managing partner of Joshi: Attorneys + Counselors. He serves as the lead counsel in high-stakes, complex family law and divorce cases. He has counseled and/or represented clients in state and federal courts across the United States and internationally, including in India, United Kingdom, Canada, Luxembourg, Hong Kong, British Virgin Islands, and China. Mr. Joshi has been admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States, state bars of New York, Michigan, the District of Columbia, and Gujarat, India. Mr. Joshi serves as a senior editor of Litigation, the flagship journal of the ABA’s Section of Litigation.
 
 

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Section I. What parental alienation is

Section II. How the courts have defined the phenomenon

Section III. How family court judges, when presented with proper evidence, have ordered appropriate interventions
a) Change of custody
b) No-contact or restraining orders
c) Specialized mental health intervention programs
d) Financial sanctions
e) Incarceration