Restaurant Industry Trends

$145.00

CLE Credits earned: 1.5 GENERAL (or 1.5 LAW & LEGAL for WA state)

The food and restaurant industry is one of the largest private employer sectors in the nation. This industry faces numerous issues regarding labor and employment. These topics include discrimination, harassment, wages and overtime, scheduling, drug testing, medical leave, discipline, data privacy and the safeguarding of confidential information. This program will discuss a wide range of issues and draw upon experiences and case examples to help the audience better understand how to counsel food and restaurant clients.

Key topics to be discussed:

•   Protecting your organization from claims of discrimination and harassment
•   Restaurant uniform and grooming standards
•   ADA website accessibility
•   Exempt employees in the restaurant
•   Tipped employees and sharing arrangements
•   Training programs
•   Unpaid internships
•   Marijuana use issues
•   Predictive scheduling
•   Paid sick leave
•   Data privacy laws impacting restaurants
•   Safeguarding confidential information and trade secrets

Date / Time: January 8, 2020

•   2:00 pm – 3:30 pm Eastern
•   1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central
•   12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Mountain
•   11:00 am – 12:30 pm Pacific

Choose a format:

•   Live Video Broadcast/Re-Broadcast: Watch Program “live” in real-time, must sign-in and watch program on date and time set above. May ask questions during presentation via chat box. Qualifies for “live” CLE credit.
•   On-Demand Video: Access CLE 24/7 via on-demand library and watch program anytime. Qualifies for self-study CLE credit. On-demand versions are made available 7 business days after the original recording date and are view-able for up to one year.

Select your state to see if this class is approved for CLE credit.

Choose the format you want.

Clear

Original Broadcast Date: August 1, 2019

Daniel R. Saeedi, Esq. focuses his practice on issues relating to employment law and unfair competition. He represents clients nationwide in the realm of trade secret theft, non-competition and non-solicitation agreements, and breaches of fiduciary duties. Daniel also provides counseling to business on how to employ best practices and policies to better position themselves to litigate unfair competition claims. In addition, he helps companies conduct complex internal investigations regarding intellectual property theft, computer fraud and data privacy issues. He also litigates unfair competition claims in federal and state courts around the country.

Daniel is experienced in matters under the Defend Trade Secrets Act, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the Stored Communications Act, the Lanham Act, various state trade secret laws, legal standards regarding non-competes, and prosecution of common law tort claims related to unfair competition. These important issues involve complex questions regarding information technology and industry norms. Daniel has assisted clients in a variety of industries, including manufacturing, logistics, information technology and software design, marketing, health and medical devices, food, entertainment, and retail.


Rachel L. Schaller, Esq. focuses her practice on employment and commercial litigation. She has experience litigating on behalf of both plaintiffs and defendants in a wide range of state and federal matters, including employment disputes, class actions, breach of contract, fraud, constitutional law, creditor’s rights, real estate, health care and professional malpractice.

Rachel received her B.A. from the University of Wisconsin and her J.D. from the Chicago-Kent College of Law. She was on the Dean’s List for both schools and was the associate editor for the Journal of International and Comparative Law during law school.

Rachel is honored as an Illinois Super Lawyers Rising Star 2019 for Employment and Labor Law.

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Section I. Protecting your organization from claims of discrimination and harassment

Section II. Restaurant uniform and grooming standards

Section III. ADA website accessibility

Section IV. Exempt employees in the restaurant

Section V. Tipped employees and sharing arrangements

Section VI. Training programs

Section VII. Unpaid internships

Section VIII. Marijuana use issues

Section IX. Predictive scheduling

Section X. Paid sick leave

Section XI. Data privacy laws impacting restaurants

Section XII. Safeguarding confidential information and trade secrets